Thursday, May 11, 2017

2017 Pressure Suit Ready to Fly

Eight years of design, building and testing seven models of a functional pressure suit, for my forthcoming expeditions to high altitudes, have resulted in the garment below. Weight 12.5lb, cost <$1,000, operating pressure 3.5psi (pure oxygen environment), overpressure valve opening 4.2psi, includes thermal garment for heat and cooling, integral communicatuions and biomedical monitoring devices, push-to-talk stud activators on gauntlets (not seen here), a unique stress-distributing 'x band' system (yet to be completed) and many more features. The entire ensemble is flameproof and has features allowing a long hike out of remote terrain. All home made in countless hours of stitching and other assembly and listening to an endless parade of audiobooks!

My flight training resumes 28 May for a 17 Aug final flying test to earn pilot's wings! I am looking forward to it.

Mostly-daily updates on Twitter.


Monday, April 24, 2017

Progress Towards Flight!

Probably the most useful skill I have ever learned, for my little domain of activity in life, is sailmaking. It taught me to make strong bonds in textiles and rope, both of which are central to my space suit project. Today, a little detail work, seen in photo below; also another photo with two team members, Paulina Spaceflight and JP! New suit is light, cheap, and works! Will reveal entirely before long!



Thursday, April 20, 2017

The London Times

Recently my project is part of a story in the Times of London; the article mistakenly indicates that I will test my suit by jumping from my balloon at high altitude, but actually I will only be jumping in emergency circumstances and plan to launch and land my craft in a controlled manner!



Very busy; new suit in production for flying this summer, and a lot of writing projects.

Roughly-daily updates at Twitter.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Another Visitor!

The other day I was thrilled to have a visiting high school student, Joseph T., and his Mom, come by the shop / my home. Joseph has exotic ideas for spacecraft and is designing a capsule to take him around the moon on a no-landing mission. He has professional training in sailmaking and is equally interested in physics. History shows that it's exactly from such 'crazy dreamers' that many advances are made.

Was on jury duty this week but starting tomorrow very EXCITING fabrication AND pressure testing of the new suit!



Thursday, March 23, 2017

Ten Hours

Ten hours' fabrication today / tonight assembled a new suit bladder from five textile patterns laying on the floor, cut last night. The suit design is subtly and substantially improved over the prior design, first flown last summer. I think this new design is very close to the final flying design for this summer's high flights! The fit is finely-tailored and exactly what is needed, it slips on and off and has extra room where needed and constrictions where they are needed.



Tuesday, March 21, 2017

A Year Ago Today!

Signing balloon purchase papers over to me in Flint, Michigan before the long drive back to Portland!

Image may contain: one or more people

Friday, March 17, 2017

Laniakea: Our Home Supercluster

I saw an updated visualization of this at Google headquarters in summer 2016. Completely mind-melting and inspiring! Click to link to YouTube.

Laniakea

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Rocket Chair and New Coverall!

First photo is my buddy Peter Madsen taking 7g's in his rocket-chair-centrifuge in Copenhagen -- inspirational! He is working on reaching space in his home-built rocket. Plenty of critics on the sidelines, just as there were of Robert Goddard and so many other original thinkers. While critics talk, Peter builds!

Second photo, tonight I seamed together the first draft of the Mark VII pressure suit coverall! Flameproof textile, even flameproof Nomex/Aramid thread -- taking as few chances as I can! We'll be flying again late Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter -- a lot of flying!





Friday, March 3, 2017

Early Phases of a Science


"...the early phases of a science require...a certain disregard for the formalisms and pedantic, creeping constructions of the ultimate scientific edifice. Perhaps what is essential is a foundation of sensible, if vague, ideas and orienting attitudes--correct in their broadest sweep if not in their precise predictions."
-- From p.701 of Hailman, J.P. 1970. Ethology Evolving. Science 168(3932):700-701.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Adaptation to Mars



How could people possibly survive on Mars? Won't radiation fry their brains? How would children develop? These general questions are why I am writing a technical, specific book outlining the principles of biological and cultural adaptation that will allow our species to explore beyond Earth, and live beyond Earth, escaping the extinction trap that Earth has been for 99% of all known life to date. So here is one recent diagram not generalizing but saying very specifically what we can expect in one instance, the development of standing and walking among Mars children. On that planet, gravity has about 1/3 the 'strength' of Earth's and yes, children will develop different physiques and even different habitual gaits to walking and running and they will even express themselves, with body language, slightly differently than Earth people. A slow differentiation, both biological and cultural, will start with the earliest generations on that planet.

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Major Step Ahead

Lots of close tailoring over the past few months have given me and my team a good understanding of the ways to fabricate excellent, tailored pressure suits. Tonight I righted a mistake we made the other night and got most of the Mark VII (seventh major design) seamed together, the seams look good and soon I can attach the helmet ring, gloves and boots -- see photos in earlier posts of our home-fabricated helmets, we've for some months now retired the old Russian air force helmet I've been using since 2009! We'll be flying this suit to increasing altitudes through this year!



Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Congratulations to Our Team Member!

Today our new team member, Trent T. of Seattle, was accepted to the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University's Scientist-Astronaut traing program; it is described below:


"For those holding a B.S. Degree from an accredited university, the PoSSUM Scientist-Astronaut Qualification Program at the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is a five-day, fully immersive training program that will provide the skills required to effectively conduct research on the next generation of commercial space vehicles as part of Project PoSSUM. Upon graduation, you will be fully trained and qualified to participate in PoSSUM graduate specializations, become a PoSSUM educator, or to fly to space as a PoSSUM Scientist-Astronaut!"


From Pacific Spaceflight that now makes two young aviators-in-training, the first was Alexander K., now a pilot-in-training at the Hillsboro Air Academy. In the photos below, Trent in a recent pressure test, and below that, Alexander K. when I visited him in central Oregon during some of my own flight training!

I'm very proud of these buddies of mine! They're the generation who will begin to explore again beyond Low Earth Orbit in the large project of human space settlement beyond Earth. Best luck, fellas!




Monday, January 9, 2017

My Tech Talk at Oregon Institute of Technology

They've now posted the talk given in mid-2016, titled "Private Development of a Low-Cost, Lightweight, Launch-Reentry Pressure Suit". I think if it plays on this page, half the images are cut off, so best to click here for the direct link.

Balloon Work on Snow Day!

My buddy Trent helped me do some routine work on the balloon this weekend. Beautiful snowy and windy weather!